The humble old Household Budget

By David Wright

In the last few years I have learned a lot about people and money.

One thing I learnt is that many people go looking for ‘the’ sexy big thing that will fix up their money mess (debt caused from spending more than they earn each week over a long period of time).

This often leads to more trouble, a small weekly leak that leads to frustration, then a sense of despair, and then a poor decision that makes things worse!

That puts pressure on relationships and sadly some break.

So the solution to the whole problem comes back to the humble old home budget, which here at the Institute we call a spending plan.

Most people have no idea how to prepare a family spending plan that actually works and that is why the conditions become perfect for what I have described above to occur.

In a typical garden variety family allowance people average all their income and expenses down to a regular time frame (e.g. Weekly, Fortnightly or Monthly). This gives a total of ins and outs for the chosen time period and so it identifies whether there is an income surplus or shortfall. Beyond that, it’s pretty useless.

Knowing it is possible to pay your bills doesn’t help much if you don’t have a roadmap that shows you ‘how’ to pay them. You need money available ‘when’ the bills arrive and the only way to ensure that can happen is to prepare a forward looking cash-flow spending plan.

A cash-flow spending plan gives target bank balances to aim for throughout the next year so you always know when you are on (or off) track. I have specialised in developing this method of spending plans because it is so amazingly effective.

If you have ever been frustrated by the constant pressure of trying to pay your regular, repeating bills I would suggest that you should open a ‘Bills’ account and prepare a Cash-Flow spending plan for your ten most troublesome large expenses on your yearly calendar and isolate them out of your normal day to day finances. They then get paid from this ‘Bills’ account and cause no further stress because they can be paid on time from this stash of money you have put aside solely for that purpose.

The Spending Planner concept I developed allows you to forecast future bank balances for repeating regular expenses so you can locate the worst day of your next year for that bills account and ensure that the bank balance on that worst day is not a negative (number) and you can join the dots between the present and the worst day right back to where you started in a year from now. Having those target bank balances to aim for every day makes it so easy, it works!

Nobody would get on board a ship or jet plane expecting to get to their destination without the pilot plotting the course connecting where they are and where they want to go. The same should apply to your financial journey.

If you want to become wealthy you need the road map to follow.

The most important part of your financial journey is simply making sure your day to day finances are in order. It becomes so much easier once you grasp this.

While you are stressed about your day to day money issues you can not keep a clear head for planning the big picture!

Who would have thought a spending plan was so important, but could be so easy?

If you think taking control of your money is all too hard, get a Spending Planner to help you. You’ll find trained Spending Planners who are extremely passionate about helping people like you. The benefit will be far more than the outlay and what you learn during the process will benefit you for the rest of your life! Simply go to www.findaspendingplanner.com

On the other hand, if you already have a Spending Plan, your finances are not under stress and you know what I’m talking about, you may be interested in joining the team. If you would like to feel the satisfaction of helping someone else turn their life around and create your own business in the process you might want to consider becoming a Spending Planner too. Find out more, go to https://spendingplannersinstitute.com/become-a-spending-planner

  • Share:

Leave a comment